Tag Archives: 17th century

Cornelisz Verbeeck

Citing Laurens Johannes Bol’s 1973 book of 17th century Dutch marine paintings, Jenny Gaschke states that Cornelisz(also Cornelis) Verbeeck “appears to have been a violent character continuously caught up in fights and stabbings, which have left us with considerable legal records.” His turbulent nature might explain those stormy waves, one of his specialties.

The catalogue for the 2008 National Maritime Museum exhibition Turmoil and Tranquility: The Sea Through the Eyes of Dutch and Flemish Masters, edited by Gaschke, also mentions that Verbeeck was a member of the Guild of St. Luke in Haarlem. Verbeeck was born in 1590, and only a few of his paintings are known presently, some perhaps remaining hidden in private collections. He is believed to have died sometime in the late 1630s in Haarlem.

A Ship in a Rough Sea, oil on panel, 39.5 x 51 cm, 1620s, National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London

A Ship in a Rough Sea, oil on panel, 39.5 x 51 cm, 1620s, National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London

A Ship in Stormy Seas, oil on panel, 31.3 x 55.6 cm , 1625, Nederlands Scheepvaartmuseum, Amsterdam

A Ship in Stormy Seas, oil on panel, 31.3 x 55.6 cm , 1625, Nederlands Scheepvaartmuseum, Amsterdam

Dutch Ships in a Rough Sea, oil on oak panel, 11.2 x 22.9 cm, late 1620s, National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London, Palmer Collection

Dutch Ships in a Rough Sea, oil on oak panel, 11.2 x 22.9 cm, late 1620s, National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London, Palmer Collection

 

Book…

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Towers of Babel

Pieter Brueghel the Elder (1526/1530–1569), Construction of the Tower of Babel, oil on panel, Height: 1,140 mm (44.88 in). Width: 1,550 mm (61.02 in), 1563, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

Pieter Brueghel the Elder (1526/1530–1569), Construction of the Tower of Babel, oil on panel, Height: 1,140 mm (44.88 in). Width: 1,550 mm (61.02 in), 1563, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

Beginning with the most famous, here are just a few of the many depictions of the Tower of Babel painted in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

 

 

 

 

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Signor Formica

E. T. A. Hoffmann, Self-portrait?, oil on canvas, ca. 1822, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin

E. T. A. Hoffmann, Self-portrait?, oil on canvas, ca. 1822, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin

Salvator Rosa, Self-portrait, oil on canvas, 1645, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Strasbourg

Salvator Rosa, Self-portrait, oil on canvas, 1645, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Strasbourg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salvator Rosa (?1615 – March 15, 1673) was an Italian, Baroque artist and poet known for his eccentric, proto-Romantic paintings. He was the subject of a fictional tale by the fantastic Romantic author, E.T.A. Hoffman, (24 January 1776 – 25 June 1822), best known for his weird tales of fantasy and horror. The story is called Signor Formica, and was published in the book, Weird Tales, Vol. I from 1885.

Here are some excerpts…

At the time that Salvator’s fame was ringing through Naples, Rome, and Tuscany—nay, through all Italy, and painters who were desirous of gaining applause were striving to imitate his peculiar and unique style, his malicious and envious rivals were laboring to spread abroad all sorts of evil reports intended to sully with ugly black stains the glorious splendor of his artistic fame. They affirmed that he had at a former period of his life belonged to a company of banditti, and that it was to his experiences during this lawless time that he owed all the wild, fierce, fantastically-attired figures which he introduced into his pictures…

Salvator Rosa, Landscape with Armed Men, oil on canvas, circa 1640, Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Salvator Rosa, Landscape with Armed Men, oil on canvas, circa 1640, Los Angeles County Museum of Art

…The rumor ran that Aniello Falcone, the painter of battle-pieces, one of the best of Salvator’s masters, had been stung into fury and filled with bloodthirsty vengeance because the Spanish soldiers had slain one of his relatives in a hand-to-hand encounter. Without delay he leagued together a band of daring spirits, mostly young painters, put arms into their hands, and gave them the name of the “Company of Death.”

This is the ferocious band of which Salvator Rosa was alleged to have been a member, working hard at butchering his fellow-men by day, and by night working just as hard at painting…

More of E. T. A. Hoffmann’s work, including his famous novel, The Life and Opinions of the Tomcat Murr, here…

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Micrographia

These are some images from Robert Hooke’s book Micrographia, c. 1665
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micrographia

scheme-24 scheme-01 scheme-15

 

 

 

 

From The Preface…

It is the great prerogative of Mankind above other Creatures, that we are not only able to behold the works of Nature, or barely to sustein our lives by them, but we have also the power of considering, comparing, altering, assisting, and improving them to various uses. And as this is the peculiar priviledge of humane Nature in general, so is it capable of being so far advanced by the helps of Art, and Experience, as to make some Men excel others in their Observations, and Deductions, almost as much as they do Beasts. By the addition of such artificial Instruments and methods, there may be, in some manner, a reparation made for the mischiefs, and imperfection, mankind has drawn upon it self, by negligence, and intemperance, and a wilful and superstitious deserting the Prescripts and Rules of Nature, whereby every man, both from a deriv’d corruption, innate and born with him, and from his breeding and converse with men, is very subject to slip into all sorts of errors.

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